What Are the Costs of Not Drug Testing?

The Department of Labor has studied the costs of alcohol and other drug abuse in the workplace.  Some costs were easy to see.  Others were hidden costs that employers might not normally think about.  The list below offers a basis for assessing the possible costs of alcohol and other drug abuse in your workplace:

 

Absenteeism  

Wages paid for days absent or for time tardy

Wages paid for temporary staff to fill in

  

Accidents/Damage  

Wages paid for days absent

Wages paid for unproductive hours during downtime

Wages paid for temporary personnel

Increased expenses for medical claims

Cost of replacing damaged equipment

Legal fees, court fees, investigative fees, travel costs

  

Health Care  

Increased costs for insurance, physicians, and more

Employee time lost

Administrative costs

  

Theft/Fraud  

Wages paid for unproductive hours during downtime

Cost of repairing damage or replacing stolen items

Cost of hiring security services and/or consultants

Legal fees, court fees, investigative costs, travel costs

In addition, business opportunities may be lost because people are not on the job or are not fully productive.  Another major cost is the time spent by co-workers, supervisors, and administrators who must find ways to get the work done when someone is not pulling his or her weight.

 

Keep in mind that while there may be more cases of alcohol and other drug abuse in larger firms than in small ones, a single troubled employee can have a major impact on a smaller firm. 

We're here to help.  If you have questions about how IHSN's drug testing programs can help you avoid the problems above,  call us at (800) 880-4444 and one of our representatives would be happy to answer all of your questions.

Go back to IHSN's Drug Testing Essentials

Office Hours:

Monday-Friday: 8am-4pm (Central Time)

Mailing Address

P.O. Box 490

Hudson, WI 54016

 

2019 by IHSN, Inc.